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Holcomb Hathaway, Publishers

Chapter 2

Keyterms

abstract
external reviewers
keywords
narrative review
primary references
scientific literature
conclusions
hypotheses
meta-analysis
nonscientific literature
references
secondary references
discussion
introduction
methods
peer-review process
results
theory

Click here to view definitions for all words.

Lab

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View or print the lab as a PDF.

Study Questions

  1. What are the differences between scientific and nonscientific literature sources?
  2. What are the differences between peer-reviewed journals and non–peer-reviewed magazines?
  3. Describe the general process that a research article must go through before it is published.
  4. List the seven basic sections found in a research article and briefly describe the purpose of each section.
  5. What are the differences between a narrative review and a meta-analysis?
  6. Describe why primary references are useful for locating graduate programs.
  7. Why has the Internet revolutionized the process of conducting a literature search?
  8. What is the difference between a “keyword search” and an “author search”?
  9. If a primary reference is not available in the university library, what is one of the best ways to access the article?

Learning Activities

  1. Go to the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s PubMed website, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Search for articles concerning central and peripheral manifestations of muscular fatigue during exercise. Write an abstract for one article.
  2. Search your library for secondary references on oxygen uptake kinetics. Create a list of five resources for this topic. Be sure to include the author’s name, copyright date, and call number.
  3. Search your library for secondary references on electromyography. Create a list of five resources for this topic. Be sure to include the author’s name, copyright date, and call number.
  4. Go to the PubMed website (see Learning Activity 1). Search for articles concerning delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Write an abstract for one article.

Suggested Readings

Baumgartner, T. A., Strong, C. H., & Hensley, L. D. (2002). Conducting and reading research in health and human performance (3rd ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.
Hyllegard, R., Mood, D. P., & Morrow, Jr., J. R. (1996). Interpreting research in sport and exercise science. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.
Thomas, J. R., Nelson, J. K., & Silverman, S. J. (2011). Research methods in physical activity (6th ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.