BookTalk: The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage

By Sharon Kane

lovelace-and-babbageI have previously written two posts about Ada Lovelace (on May 19, 2016, I wrote about Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine as well as Ada’s Algorithm; I also discussed her as part of Historical Heartthrobs on September 14).   After I read these various biographies and explored websites related to her, and after I learned about planned activities to celebrate Ada Lovelace Day on October 11, I wanted more. Evidently, so did Sydney Padua, who did something about it. She wrote and illustrated The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer (2015, Pantheon Books). Told in graphic-novel form, the captions and pictures are full of information about Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage, their work, families, contemporaries, and Victorian society; adding to the work are copious footnotes, annotations, and end notes. On page 19, readers see a drawing representing one of Babbage’s famous parties, including guests Alfred, Lord Tennyson; the mathematician Mary Somerville; the Duke of Wellington; Caroline and John Herschel; Michael Faraday; Charles Darwin; Charles Dickens; Florence Nightingale, and more. We can assume the conversations were lively indeed. The first chapter ends on page 29 with the reporting of Ada’s death at age 36 and Charles’s death at age 79, and the reminder that the first computers were not built until the 1940s. What’s left to be told in the next several hundred pages of this book?

I only had to turn the page to find out: “But wait! That ending to the story of Lovelace and Babbage is only ONE of the infinite array of possible outcomes, occurring on the more boring worlds that are part of THE MULTIVERSE!” The author then takes us along on awesome adventures, complete with explanations of some of the math, science, and history being alluded to. I especially enjoyed the segment of Ada in an Alice-in-Wonderland-type situation.

I cannot adequately convey the facial expressions, the cleverness, the sheer fun of this book. I’ll tell you that I learned from the book jacket that Sydney Padua is “an animator and visual effects artist, usually employed in making giant monsters appear to be attacking people for the movies.” That explains a lot. I love this unique book, and I believe Ada and Charles would approve of how they are portrayed throughout.

Happy Ada Lovelace Day! I hope you’ll join others around the world every second Tuesday in October to celebrate women in the STEM fields and encourage young women to explore rewarding career options relating to math and science.

Appropriate for high school and beyond

math, science, computer programming, ELA, history, art

BookTalk: Books About Fibonacci and His Numbers

By Sharon Kane

fibonacciNumbers fascinated Italian mathematician Fibonacci. He probably would have liked 2010; that year saw the publication of three intriguing picture books featuring the number sequence named for him (in 2016, the books are worth revisiting). I think I would first share with students Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature, by Sarah C. Campbell (Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press). The short, simple text on each page instructs readers to count the petals on various flowers. (Photographs are by the author and Richard P. Campbell.) The pattern is noted, as is the rule “in order to get the next number, you add the two numbers before it” (p. 13). Later pages contain a bit more text, explaining how the principle applies to spirals in nature. Pine cones, sunflowers, pineapples, and snails are pictured in vivid color.

After students have had time to appreciate the mathematical and visual beauty they encounter in nature, I’d offer them Blockhead: The Life of Fibonacci, by Joseph D’Agnese (New York: Henry Holt and Company. Illustrated by John O’Brien). The author fictionalizes some details of Fibonacci’s youth and his relationships with family and friends, since little is known about the mathematician. Readers become involved in the solution to a riddle about rabbit reproduction and discover, along with Fibonacci, that “These are the numbers Mother Nature uses to order the universe” (p. 36). On the last page the author invites readers to go beyond the pages of the book, offering clues as to where to look for more Fibonacci number patterns in nature.

rabbit-problemBoth books speak of a mathematical rabbit problem Fibonacci posed more than 800 years ago. So, head next to Emily Gravett’s picture book/calendar The Rabbit Problem (Simon & Schuster). You’ll see what happens when two rabbits fall in love in Fibonacci’s Field and must stay there for a year with their growing family. A delightful surprise occurs in December, when they are allowed out and the population of the field changes from 144 pairs to 0.

Appropriate for intermediate, middle, and high school grades

math, ELA, art, science

Book Talk: Visions of Infinity: The Great Mathematical Problems

by Sharon Kane

visions-of-infinityIf you hear a student complain that a math problem is taking too long to solve, you can encourage her with this sentence from Ian Stewart’s Visions of Infinity: The Great Mathematical Problems (2013, Basic Books): “Fermat’s last theorem was an enigma for 350 years until Andrew Wiles dispatched it after seven years of toil” (ix). If someone asks what math has to do with life outside of school, or if this person thinks math is something static and unchanging, you can quote Stewart again: “At a rough estimate, the world’s research mathematicians number about a hundred thousand, and they produce more than two million pages of new mathematics every year (pp. ix–x).” And if students think math is done in solitude, or that it’s not important to show their work, you can offer this gem of a metaphor:

One recent piece of algebra, carried out by a team of some 25 mathematicians, was described as “a calculation the size of Manhattan.” That wasn’t quite true, but it erred on the side of conservatism. The answer was the size of Manhattan; the calculation was a lot bigger. (p. x)

I got all this from just the Preface, so you can imagine the richness of the material in the rest of the book as it describes the great mathematical problems. Ian Stewart is a mathematical storyteller, or a storytelling mathematician. (You can see a BookTalk on Professor Stewart’s Casebook of Mathematical Mysteries previously posted on this site.) In his final chapter, he offers twelve unsolved problems that mathematicians are working on, with intriguing names like “Odd Perfect Numbers,” “Lonely Runner Conjecture,” “Langton’s Ant,” and “Existence of Perfect Cuboids.” Who can resist?

I will never be famous for solving a math problem, but if I have Visions of Infinity in my classroom library maybe one of my students will be. I’ll end this BookTalk with another quote that I could offer to a student who thinks mathematics is boring or dry; notice how Stewart uses imagery to invite readers into his world:

Mathematics… is… like a natural landscape, where you can never really say where the valley ends and the foothills begin, where the forest merges into woodland, scrub, and grassy plains, where lakes insert regions of water into every other kind of terrain, where rivers link the snow-clad slopes of the mountains to the distant, low-lying oceans. But this ever-changing mathematical landscape consists not of rocks, water, and plants, but of ideas; it is tied together not by geography, but by logic. And it is a dynamic landscape, which changes as new ideas and methods are discovered or invented … Over time, some of the peaks and obstacles acquire iconic status. These are the great problems. (pp. 7–8)

Appropriate for high school

math, ELA

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BookTalk: Professor Stewart’s Casebook of Mathematical Mysteries

By Sharon Kane

casebook-of-mathematical-mysteriesSome of your students might like reading mysteries. Some might like literary allusions and parodies. Others might be fans of Sherlock Holmes, delighting in the original stories and/or recent adaptations in print and film. A wonderful addition to your classroom library—of interest to all these students—would be Professor Stewart’s Casebook of Mathematical Mysteries (2014, Basic Books), by mathematician Ian Stewart. Readers are introduced to Soames and Dr. Watsup, who live in Victorian England, across the street from a famous detective pair, and take on cases that require mathematical solutions. The book contains enough puzzles to carry a teacher through an entire school year. Students will race to enter the classroom to see the title of their next case. Will it be “The Riddle of the Golden Rhombus”? “The Puzzle of the Purloined Papers”? “Jigsaw Paradox”? “The Soup Plate Trick”? If they have ever wondered about the shape of an orange peel or the history of Sudoku, how to measure the height of a tree, why birthdays are good for you, or how to win the lottery, they should join Soames and Dr. Watsup as they share data, conjectures, figures, formulas, hypotheses, evidence, and epiphanies. There will be laughter, along with some groans, along the way. In the spirit of this book, students can create their own problems and scenarios for classmates and teachers to solve.

Now for our problem: Where should this book be most appropriately housed? In the English classroom? Math classroom? Somewhere else? Collaborate with your colleagues to come up with a solution based on mathematical input and principles. Maybe division will be required. Students could encounter “Fermat’s Last Limerick” and “Mathematical Haiku” in English/language arts; “How to Stop Unwanted Echoes” in physics; “Bargain with the Devil” in philosophy; “The Adventure of the Rowing Men” and “The Hound of the Basketballs” in physical education; “Square Leftovers” in Home and Careers; “Polygons Forever” in math; “Mussel Power” in biology; “Random Harmonic Series” in music; “Why Do My Friends Have More Friends than I Do?” and “Narcissistic Numbers” in psychology; “Proof that the World Is Round” in history; “The Affair of the Above-Average Driver” in driver education, and so on. This book contains mysteries for every discipline.

Appropriate for high school

math, ELA

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BookTalk: Historical Heartthrobs

by Sharon Kane
historical-heartthrobsHave you ever thought about the romantic interests of John Wilkes Booth? Or the marriage of Harriet Beecher Stowe? How about the family life of Roberto Clemente? Or the relationship between Harry Houdini and his magician’s assistant? The theme of love brings together 50 people, famous in a variety of fields, in Kelly Murphy’s Historical Heartthrobs: 50 Timeless Crushes—from Cleopatra to Camus (with contributor Hallie Fryd; 2014, Zest Books). Each short chapter contains subheadings regarding the subject’s life story, sex life, best feature, and “Heat Factor.” Chapters then end with quotes from or about the subject. A lot of information is packed into this unique reference book.

Whether they read straight through or browse randomly chosen chapters, readers will appreciate the humor as well as gain knowledge about the historical heartthrobs being introduced. They may remember quirky tidbits like Salvador Dali’s moustache; the low “Heat Factor” the authors give to John Wilkes Booth: “Colder than an assassin’s blade” (p. 51); or the high scores awarded to Bessy Coleman: “She believed she could fly! And then she touched the sky!” (p. 115) and W.E.B. Du Bois: “Positively burning (with the desire for change)” (p. 71).

Readers may be spurred to learn more about the figures they have been introduced to and inspired by. Later, they can bring a bit of knowledge about the people they’ve met on these pages to their content area classes. They, and their students, may meet again with Ada Lovelace in computer class, Pablo Picasso and Frida Kahlo in art class, Nikola Tesla and Jane Goodall in science, Lord Byron and Sylvia Plath in English, Fidel Castro and Mustafa Kemal Ataturk in global studies. They will have gained many acquaintances, as well as a bit of gossip to liven up their lessons.

This book shows that fun and learning can go together, as can love and fame.

Appropriate for high school

art, history, science, social studies, ELA, math

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Book Talk: Tru and Nelle

by Sharon Kane
tru and nelleMany readers who love To Kill a Mockingbird go on to read one or more of the many biographies of Harper Lee. They discover that her childhood in Monroeville, Alabama, provided many experiences that Nelle (as she was known) later wove into her classic novel set in the fictional Maycomb. Readers also learn of her friendship with little Truman (Streckfus Persons, later Capote), who also grew up in Monroeville. The children inspired each other and eventually influenced each other’s adult writing. Versions of Nelle appear in Capote’s work, and vice versa.

G. Neri, in Tru and Nelle (2016, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), tells a fictionalized version of the friendship of these two young misfits. He explains that his story is based on real events, “but I’ve rearranged them into a single story and added more than a few fibs for spice, hopefully making for a flavorful bowl of southern homestyle yarns” (p. 318). The children, inspired by the Sherlock Holmes stories they have read, play detective games and eventually become embroiled in a mystery that involves an encounter with the Ku Klux Klan. They write stories on a typewriter given to them by Nelle’s father; when Tru moves to New York, they promise to keep writing, and to go somewhere together when they grow up.

Teachers could offer this book as for additional reading while students are reading To Kill a Mockingbird; students will delight in finding episodes that are similar to the ones in the classic. They may also be inspired to write creatively about the childhood of one of their own favorite authors, conducting research and pondering the influences that led to the works they admire.

I’d pair this book with I am Am Scout: A Biography of Harper Lee, by Charles J. Shields (reissued in 2015 by Square Fish Books).  A book talk about that biography was posted on this site in January 2014 and can be found here: http://hhpcommunities.com/youngadultlit/?s=i+am+scout.

Appropriate for intermediate, middle, and high school grades

ELA, history

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Book Talk: Tender

by Sharon Kane

tenderWho is manipulating whom? This is the question I kept asking myself as I read Tender, by Belinda McKeon (2016, Little, Brown and Company). In 1990s Ireland, first-year college student Catherine meets James, who has returned after a year in Germany serving as an assistant to a famous photographer. As their close friendship develops, he confides to her that he is gay, something that much of their society has not yet accepted. Catherine offers James encouragement when he decides to come out to his mother, who does not take the news well. (He wouldn’t even consider telling his father.) But something about their relationship began to worry me when I got to a part where James insists that Catherine come home with him for a weekend and then mocks, chides, and pressures her when she says No. She decides to go home with him.

Catherine continues to support James through letters after he goes away again. Again, I was bothered. James is intense, to the point where I found him controlling. Catherine’s parents tell her he is trouble; I felt that, too, though not for the same reason they rejected him. When James returns, he is constantly around. Catherine tries to protect him, tries to listen and understand when he complains about how hard life is for him as a gay man, tries to improve herself whenever he criticizes her. Both Catherine and I were feeling smothered.

But then James finds friends; James finds ways to fit in; James begins to have some success with meeting men. And Catherine? Catherine finds that she is jealous, possessive, and obsessively in love.

I will stop talking plot here. I think this could be an important story for teens to read; although not at all didactic, it could serve as a cautionary tale. Signs throughout point to an unhealthy relationship–signs that were ignored. As the situation escalated, the relationship turned destructive. This book is for mature readers and belongs in the category of New Adult (for an audience from approximately age 17 to 25). It’s thought provoking, that’s for sure.

psychology; ELA; social studies

appropriate for upper high school grades and beyond

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Book Talk: The Handy Chemistry Answer Book

 

By Sharon Kane

chemistry answer bookI knew I was going to like Justin P. Lomont and Ian C. Stewart’s teaching style when I read the following in the Introduction to The Handy Chemistry Answer Book (2013: Visible Ink Press): “We think that you’ve probably wondered … what sodium laureth sulfate is doing in your shampoo, but maybe never had the chance to ask. We are interested in explaining these things in plain language, and we’ve kept a conversational tone throughout the book” (p. xi). I confirmed that their teaching philosophy is consistent with mine when, after saying they’ve used a simplified drawing system to show chemical structures, they advise, “Take what you can from these abstract drawings, but don’t dwell on them. Focus on the stories we’re trying to tell” (p. xi).

Students were responsible for many of the queries in the book, so your own students might also be curious as to the answers to authentic questions as varied as: “What makes metals feel colder than air to the touch?” (p. 37); “Why can some batteries be recharged and others cannot?” (p. 107); “How is the presence of illegal narcotics detected?” (p. 109); “What is my credit card made of?” (p. 171); “When I get an MRI, what is the machine actually measuring?” (p. 196); “How do painkillers know what part of the body to target?” (p. 204); “Why does asparagus make pee smell weird?” (p. 211); and “How do ants know how to organize their colonies so efficiently?” (p. 215).

For answers to these questions and more, check out the book. You’ll also find whole chapters on sustainable “green” chemistry, kitchen chemistry, and experiments that can be done at home.

I loved reading this book. My favorite new knowledge is: “There are six types of quarks, which are referred to as different ‘flavors.’ These are named up, down, top, bottom, charm, and strange” (p. 153). Who knew?

Appropriate for middle and high school

Science, ELA

Book Talk: You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen

by Sharon Kane

tuskegee airmenMany powerful history lessons are packed into Carole Boston Weatherford’s collection of verses, You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen (2016, Simon & Schuster). The poems give numerous examples of the courage and skills of the African American pilots as well as the challenges they faced due to racism at all levels of American society. Credit is given to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who visited Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, flew in a plane piloted by an African American, and then convinced her husband Franklin Roosevelt to order the army to “give black pilots a shot” (p. 6). We learn of breakthroughs by various individuals: Dorie Miller, the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross; Joe Lewis, who in 1938 took advantage of his chance “to knock out Nazism and to hand Hitler an upset” (p. 29); and James G. Thompson, who began a “Double V” campaign, calling on African Americans “to support the war on foreign soil and to push for justice at home” (p. 37).

In the Author’s Note, Weatherford gives further information about the Tuskegee Airmen and the respect they earned as a fighter squadron, paving the way for President Truman’s Executive Order 9981 ending segregation in the U.S. armed forces in 1948. A time line that starts with the abolishing of slavery in 1865 ends with 2007, when “Tuskegee Airmen are presented with the Congressional Medal of Honor at a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol” and 2009, when “Tuskegee Airmen are invited guests at the inauguration of Barack Obama” (p. 76). Scratchboard illustrations throughout are provided by Jeffery Boston Weatherford, who based his work on archival photographs.

In my classes, I plan to pair this with Steve Sheinkin’s Port Chicago 50 (2014), a nonfiction account of another group of African Americans in the armed forces who faced discrimination and injustice during their service in World War II. These two stories—one from the east coast and one from the west—will help us understand the enormity of the injustices that African Americans faced in the military as they risked and gave their lives for their country.

Appropriate for middle school and high school

history, ELA

BookTalk: The Garden of Monsieur Monet

by Sharon Kane

garden of monetI recently visited one of the most famous gardens in the world: a garden in northern France, in the village of Giverny. My guides were Giancarlo Ascari and Pia Valentinis, author and illustrator of The Garden of Monsieur Monet (2015, Royal Academy of Arts). The first pages of this graphic novel show Claude Monet and his family arriving at their new home, but what I encountered upon opening the book gave me the context for the story that was to follow. Titled “The Belle Epoque,” an introduction describes the period at the end of the nineteenth and start of the twentieth centuries, when arts and sciences were flourishing across Europe. Illustrations and captions give information about the cinema, motor cars, railway lines, electric lights, radio transmissions, the discovery of vaccines, aircraft, the construction of the Eiffel Tower, and art and fashion from the newly explored Japan. Everything sounds positive until one sees the words in the bottom right-hand corner: “In 1914 the belle epoque came to a tragic end with the beginning of the First World War.”

For many pages, we don’t have to think about war. We can join Monet as he decorates his home with Japanese art throughout; as he heads to the fields to paint in the open air; as he brings in guests to enjoy the flowering gardens. But war intrudes, and we see the gardeners leaving to fight. We learn that a depressed Monet, hearing the sound of the artillery in the distance, goes inside his home to re-create his water garden on huge canvases, even as his eyesight fails.

The closing pages are a delight, displaying an illustrated catalog of some of the flowers found in Monet’s garden: Japanese cherry, foxtail lily, snowdrop, white foxglove, flowering quince, gladiolus, and many more.

On one double-page spread we see eleven versions of Monet’s haystack paintings. “Monsieur Monet is so fascinated by the variations of light and color that he paints the same subject over and over again at different times of the day and in different seasons of the year” (unpaged). Students can follow the master’s example as they notice, and capture in some medium, the objects and scenes from their everyday lives. They can also apply the principle of perspective to Monet himself, by exploring other biographies of the artist to see what is emphasized and compare them to this biography.

Art, history, ELA

Appropriate for intermediate and middle grades, and high school